The psychedelic-tinged title track is one of Duke Pearson’s greatest works. I love the way it unfolds with an air of mystery. The rest of the LP doesn’t quite raise my drawbridge to the same level. This may be an issue of timing—the tropical vibes that permeate the other tracks are inconsistent with this cold, winter New York day. I’ll spin it again come summertime and perhaps it’ll hit me differently. For the most part, once you move past the depth of the title track (which may take several listens…it’s *THAT* good) the album veers from post-bop, late night grooves to tropical excursions underscored by Brazilian rhythms (and occasional nods to the avant-garde) as the multi-talented Pearson leads a small combo on this 1968 outing. The band: Duke Pearson (piano), Jerry Dodgion (flute/alto flute—side note, it’s his flute that graces the well-known theme from ’Shaft’), Bobby Hutcherson (vibes), Sam Brown & Alexander Gafa (guitars), Bob Cranshaw (bass), Mickey Roker (drums), Carlos “Patato” Valdes & Victor Pantoja (congas/guiro). Pearson wore a lot of hats at Blue Note, arranging sessions for other artists, composing, performing and he was also an executive in an A&R capacity. His albums—particularly this one—demonstrate the breadth and scope of his abilities, particularly his preternatural understanding of which instruments in what combos played by which musicians would deliver the goods. Perhaps it’s too cold at the moment for me to appreciate the album as a whole, but I just spun the title track again and it blew my mind. This is first pressing BST 84293, stereo, VAN GELDER in the deadwax