benniemaupin

Miles Davis ‘A Tribute To Jack Johnson’

Incendiary. Recorded on this day (7 April, 1970) in Columbia Studio B, this record moves even further into rock, soul, and funk excursions that began as far back as the waning days of the Second Great Quintet. Those initial sparks grew into a flame with ‘In A Silent Way,’ fire with ‘Bitches Brew,’ and full-on conflagration with ‘A Tribute to Jack Johnson.’ Miles, in particular, is playing at the top of his game—his solos are fierce, edgy, and take NO prisoners whatsoever. As a bandleader, his stated goal was to “put together the greatest rock ’n’ roll band you ever heard.” Mission accomplished: John McLaughlin & Sonny Sharrock (guitars), Herbie Hancock & Chick Corea (keyboards), Steve Grossman (saxophone), Bennie Maupin (bass clarinet), Dave Holland & Michael Henderson (bass), and Billy Cobham & Jack DeJohnette (drums). The two side-long tracks cover a lot of ground. Tension. Release. Tranquility. Fury. The lines between what was planned and what happened are difficult to ascertain, and ultimately I’m not sure it matters. Whether you see this is a rock record with jazz cred or a jazz record that decided to party with a rock band, it’s another example of bending the course of music to his will. And we’re all the better for it

Andrew Hill ‘One For One’

I can’t honestly say that Andrew Hill’s music is the easiest or most obvious jazz to get one’s head around. But I can honestly say that his music has been some of the most consistently thrilling, engaging, and satisfying music I’ve discovered. The unexpected is the only constant in his boundary-testing music, and his run of excellence at Blue Note from 63-70–with over 15 albums worth of material that were all top shelf—is the stuff of legend. ‘One For One’ is a 1975 compilation from 3 previously unreleased sessions:
1965: Freddie Hubbard (cornet) Joe Henderson (tenor sax) Richard Davis (bass) & Joe Chambers (drums)
1969: Bennie Maupin (tenor sax, flute) Sanford Allen (violin) Al Brown, Selwart Clarke (viola) Kermit Moore (cello) Ron Carter (bass) & Mickey Roker (drums)
1970: Bennie Maupin (tenor, flute & bass clarinet) Pat Patrick (alto, flute & baritone sax) Charles Tolliver (trumpet) & Ben Riley (drums)
“Ocho Rios” from the ‘65 session may be my favorite Hill track, ever. Some of the material (and then some) was eventually issued as ‘Pax’ and all if it (and even more) was issued as a Mosaic 3CD box some years later. I like the way Joe Henderson is mixed on this LP more so than the CD—to my ears, his presence is more ferocious on vinyl, and he’s going more toe-to-toe with Hubbard. On the CD, there’s something about the mix that makes him sound a bit tamer, which gives a different sonic fingerprint to the session, relegating Henderson more to the role of straight-man to Hubbard’s youthful brashness. But that’s my ears, and you should trust yours, and both LP and CD have lots to offer. The Blue Note Classics Twofers LP series is largely high quality, with unissued material and good liner notes. Most can still be found without too much trouble or $, but they have gotten scarcer, and prices have risen…if you collect, don’t sleep on these. I have yet to get one I haven’t loved

Woody Shaw ‘Blackstone Legacy’

Recording for this gem occurred during this week in 1970. Inevitable comparisons to @milesdavis ‘Bitches Brew’ continue, but they ring slightly hollow to my ears. BBrew was the Big Bang of jazz/rock fusion. ‘Blackstone Legacy’ is 100% jazz through and through. The record is amped with a healthy dose of electricity via George Cables on electric piano, and the presence of some bass clarinet courtesy of the amazing Bennie Maupin, which might trick you into thinking about BBrew, but this record doesn’t have any rock music DNA at all. Instead, immerse yourself in electrified post-bop, inside/outside modal journeys that are all fairly long, with enough free elements to be surprising, challenging and engaging. Shaw and Bartz are clearly having a lot of fun playing together, and Maupin picks up both tenor sax and flute to join in as well. Standup bass duties fall to the legendary Ron Carter, while electric bass is wielded by Clint Houston who would collaborate frequently with Shaw for years to come. Houston wrote the track “Sunshowers” on Shaw’s breakout ‘Rosewood’ LP (my fave jazz record EVER) which is one its most endearing tracks. Finally, future Return to Forever drummer Lenny White just kills it on skins, hitting them with a fast, firm punch without ever overplaying. All compositions are by either Shaw or Cables. This is a first pressing on Contemporary S7627/8, stereo. Wild stuff

Horace Silver ‘Serenade to a Soul Sister’

Silver’s flair for melody, funky style, and inspired choice of bandmates results in another classic. While ’The Jody Grind’ remains my favorite Horace Silver-led session, this one has raced up the charts quickly into second place. If the opening track doesn’t put a smile on your face, inspire you to get into the groove and boogie, you need a drink. Or therapy. Or both. Certainly one of the happier jazz records one can reach for, and overall a great listen. It features a who’s who of talent, including Charles Tolliver (trumpet), Bennie Maupin (sax), Stanley Turrentine (tenor sax), Bob Cranshaw (bass), Mickey Roker (drums) and Billy Cobham (drums). Terrific soundtrack to a beautiful NYC morning