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John Coltrane ‘Coltrane’s Sound’

Coltrane’s studio work in the final week of Oct 1960 produced the acclaimed and hugely popular ‘My Favorite Things’, the lesser-known but essential ‘Coltrane Plays the Blues’, and the middle child whose strengths and qualities have only become more apparent over the years, ‘Coltrane’s Sound’. I could pontificate about the track “Equinox” for hours—far and away my favorite @johncoltrane original, and one of my favorite jazz songs, EVER. The emotional wallop this tune packs knocks me flat every time. The power, gravitas and solemnity that pours forth from the speakers when this song plays is felt as much as heard. If it doesn’t give you the feels, see a doctor immediately. The other three originals and two standards are also amazingly played, and I underscore the word “amazing” because this is only the THIRD TIME pianist McCoy Tyner and the SECOND TIME drummer Elvin Jones had recorded with ‘Trane. It’s certainly fun to over-analyze the three albums that these sessions produced, comparing, contrasting and discussing them to rank them within the pantheon of Coltrane’s @atlanticrecords era. When I’m in that frame of mind, I tend to reach for this album more often than the other two. But ultimately it’s more satisfying to consider them as one body of work and play them all! This pressing is a Japanese reissue, mono, part of the Jazz Analog Premium Collection produced by Kouki Hanawa WPJR-10053/Atlantic ‎– 1419 @mccoytyner

Kenny Dorham/Jackie McLean ‘Inta Somethin’

Great set of advanced hard bop recorded live at the Jazz Workshop in San Francisco 13 Nov 1961. The set is mostly standards, plus a blues-based original and (most notably) the first appearance of Dorham’s “Us” (aka “Una Mas”) which he’d truly nail in April ’63 with Mighty Joe Henderson in the sax chair. But back to Nov ’61, the Dorham/McLean frontline work marvelously together. McLean—who was definitely wearing a bit of Coltrane on his sleeve that night—was slowly inching towards the more progressive sounds he’d find in 1963, and Dorham was also enjoying the edges of hard bop but there aren’t yet many sharp angles in their playing. Instead, they channel their more adventurous impulses into intensity, with “Lover Man” and “It Could Happen To You” being exceptionally well-played. All-star points to pianist Walter Bishop Jr. who sounds like he’s been playing with these guys for years. Bassist Leroy Vinnegar and drummer Art Taylor bring plenty of finesse and swing—if you like your hard bop served up sizzling, you’ll be happy the tape was rolling that night. This is Japanese reissue from 1978 via King Records GXF-3119 of Pacific Jazz PJ-41, stereo

Grant Green ‘Oleo’

There’s a synergy between guitarist Grant Green and pianist Sonny Clark that makes all the sessions they recorded in the five week period between 23 Dec 1961 and 31 Jan 1962 essential listening. Quality however doesn’t necessarily run consistently with A&R decisions and as Green’s more commercially leaning soul jazz proclivities were Blue Note’s focus, none were released during Green’s lifetime. When they were finally rolled out of the vault in the 80s and split into individual albums, vinyl availability was limited to Japan for two of those three sessions. Blue Note has since compiled them into a double CD (“The Complete Grant Green/Sonny Clark Quartets”) which is spectacular, but for the vinyl hounds this release ‘Oleo’ was the last of the sessions Green/Clark did together and issued by King in Japan in 1980 as part of the “Worlds First Appearance” series (GXF 3065). Like “Gooden’s Corner”, this one features Sam Jones on bass and Louis Hayes on drums supporting the melodic interplay between Green and Clark, with highlights being the Green original “Hip Funk”, a fun take on Sonny Rollins’ “Oleo” and a ripping run at “My Favorite Things”. Sonically, this Japanese pressing sounds pretty terrific though truth be told, the double CD sounds as good and costs less. Besides, the CD contains the equally brilliant work of the other sessions including the crowning achievement: the Green/Clark Quartet (with Art Blakey on drums) turning “It Ain’t Necessarily So” on its head—you gotta hear it. Of the LPs that reveal the awesomeness of these sessions—“Oleo”, “Gooden’s Corner”, and “Nigeria”—this one is the least essential but STILL ESSENTIAL. Again, pick up the CD and you get it all and it’s all pretty great