Rare Records

Kohsuke Mine Quintet ‘Daguri’

A high-energy, modal/spiritual, face-melter of a jazz record that packs a mighty wallop. Fans of McCoy Tyner’s early 70s Milestone records will go bonkers over this. Kohsuke Mine handles both tenor and soprano sax and is the composer of all five mid-to-long tracks on ‘Daguri’. He’s joined by Hideo Miyata (tenor sax), Fumio Itabashi (piano), Hideaki Mochizuki (bass) and Hiroshi Murakami (drums). The opening track is molten intensity, as the saxes and piano intertwine and build the tension, somehow digging the groove deeper while soaring higher. They dare one another to keep up and the challenge is accepted as each peak is reached and transcended. The drum and piano work throughout moves from intricate to manic to hyperactive—the first track alone will leave you breathless and reaching for another coffee. But the instrumental verbosity never steps on the tunefulness…groove, swing, and virtuosity co-exist in ideal proportions on every track. There’s only one tune, “Self Contradiction” that’s on the downtempo side. Otherwise, you should set the gearshift for the high gear of your soul! The title track appeared on the compilation J-Jazz Vol 2 which came out last year, but the full LP is very much worth seeking out. A bit of a tough pull on vinyl, but it is available across the digital spectrum and also received a CD reissue recently so it’s around. Lethal, but who ever said great jazz was safe?

Charles Tolliver/Music Inc. ‘Live at Slugs’

Today marks the 50th anniversary of this remarkable live set of exploratory modal/post-bop that Mr. Charles Tolliver himself has called out as a personal favorite. The audience at Slugs that night must have been pinned to their seats by the intensity of this Music Inc. quartet which also includes Stanley Cowell (piano), Cecil McBee (bass) and Jimmy Hopps (drums). All give stellar performances. Fans of Woody Shaw’s work or ‘Live at the Lighthouse’-era Lee Morgan will *LOVE* this album, which never quite drifts into avant territory though it does peek through the fence to take a glance once in a while. Tracking down Strata East vinyl isn’t easy—original pressings are scarce, bootlegs sound pretty crummy, and unfortunately both volumes have yet to see a modern vinyl reissue, but hopefully an enterprising boutique label might step in? (Looking at you @purepleasurerecords !) However you *CAN* pick them up in (to be honest) much better sound quality as part of the Charles Tolliver ‘Mosaic Select 20’ triple CD, which combines both volumes of the Slugs LPs, the equally terrific (and difficult to find) ‘Live in Tokyo 73’ LP, and a third CD which combines additional tracks from BOTH Slugs and Tokyo which were left off the original LPs due to time constraints. Sound quality on that third CD is a bit thinner than the originally released material but not so much so to impair any listening enjoyment, and the unreleased material is KILLER. Hat tip to Tolliver’s vision in forming Strata East which took a lot of guts—Strata East aspired to establish a greater degree of artist independence in an industry rife with exploitation, institutionalized racism, and the prioritization of commercial potential over artistry. As stated on the back of Vol 1 “MUSIC INC was created out of the desire to assemble men able to see the necessity for the survival of a heritage and an Art in the hopes that the sacrifices and high level of communication between them will eventually reach every soul

Doug Carn ‘Infant Eyes’

Modal, spiritual, and soul-jazz blend beautifully on a record that packs a lot of power. I’m fussy about jazz vocal records, and I don’t reach for them often, but this one is FANTASTIC. Jean Carn’s vocals convey a sense of purpose. Of clarity. Of hope. Things that seem to be in short supply in so many places at the moment. The lyrics (which all have a spiritual/inspirational vibe) were written by her husband, leader, and keyboardist Doug Carn. He then worked them into new arrangements of compelling compositions by Wayne Shorter (“Infant Eyes”), John Coltrane (“Acknowledgement”), Horace Silver (“Peace”), and Bobby Hutcherson (“Little B’s Poem”). All are knockout performances. You’ll also hear impressive instrumentals, including a killer take on McCoy Tyner’s “Passion Dance,” and the Doug Carn original “Moon Child.” The band is top-notch: in addition to Jean’s vocals and sizzling organ/piano playing by Doug, you’ve got George Harper (tenor sax, flute), Bob Frazier (trumpet, flugelhorn), Henry “The Skipper” Franklin (bass), Al Hall, Jr. (trombone), and Michael Carvin (drums). ‘Infant Eyes’ was originally released on Gene Russell’s legendary Black Jazz Records in 1971. The label released a total of 20 albums in its short four-year existence, all of which share two properties: excellence and rarity. This one seems to have been reissued (and bootlegged) more than some of the others, though, so it’s findable, and you can also stream/download it on most digital platforms. If you’re looking to take a deep breath and lower your shoulders a couple of inches, while at the same time be inspired by a soaring, uplifting, deep, well-played jazz album, Doug Carn’s ‘Infant Eyes’ may be the record for you. It’s a lovely, sunny, Saturday morning here in the NYC area, and this record is making for fine listening. Make it a great day

Stop Over

The latest release in the BBE J Jazz Masterclass series has dropped on vinyl, CD, and across the digital spectrum, and it’s a stone-cold, hard-bop killer. As only 100 copies of ‘Stop Over’ were pressed back in 1976, the rarity/reputation of this Japanese quintet’s performance had traveled to many more ears than the music itself. So this is a very welcome reissue, done to the usual high standards of this series overseen by Tony Higgins and Mike Peden. The two LPs are cut at 45RPM for optimal sound, and my ears say “mission accomplished.” Here and there, it seems the original recording does emphasize the drums, though not in an off-putting way, and I’d say if anything the occasional ride cymbal at the fore only ramps up the intensity. The terrific liner notes by @the_jazz_dad will tell you all you ever wanted to know about how this record was made, and there’s also a new essay from pianist Toshiyuki Sekine which provides a firsthand narrative that provides additional context, presenting a complete picture of that moment in time. It makes for great reading, and the immersion of a good essay in a gatefold cover is a particular joy that…well, you either know it or you don’t. The songs include Bobby Hutcherson’s “Little B’s Poem,” Danny Zeitlin’s “Carole’s Garden,” Todd Dameron’s “Soultrane,” and Cedar Walton’s “Turquoise Twice”; along with the Sasaki original ‘Stop Over’ (which made its first appearance on last years J-Jazz Vol 2 collection, also from). The quintet is Noriyasu Watanabe-alto sax, Hideto Sasaki-trumpet, Toshiyuki Sekine-piano, Kei Narita-bass, and Takaski Kurosaki-drums. If you dig the sound of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers when they’re firing on all cylinders, this’ll blow you away. All of the BBE J-Jazz compilations and the Masterclass Series have been eye/ear-opening, and wildly satisfying—recommended to all, jazz newbies and experts will find lots to love here. Here’s hoping the series will continue

Phil Woods ‘Warm Woods’

Phil Woods ‘Warm Woods’ is of the greatest jazz releases on @epicrecords and the perfect soundtrack to this blustery, chilly day here in New York. Ignore the review at All Music Guide, which is numerically inconsistent with its verbiage, and both are inconsistent with the quality of this set, which is SUPERB. Woods has a beautiful, unique, recognizable tone on alto sax “Dr. Wu”…’nuff said), and he leads a fine quartet here that includes Bob Corwin-piano, Sonny Dallas-bass, and Nick Stabulas-drums. All of the material is either ballad or mid-tempo, and except for two original compositions by Woods, the rest of the program is comprised of standards. While tempos may not get your heart racing, the amount of heart that’s poured into every performance is HUGE, and if some of these pieces don’t give you a big case of the feels, you might want to step away from ‘Tiger King’ for a little while and get into some deep headphone/jazz communion to recharge your soul. The two sessions for this LP were recorded in October and November of 1957, and the album was issued the following year. This pressing is a Japanese reissue from 1973, ECPZ-8, mono. I like how this sounds in mono, though I’ve not heard a stereo pressing to compare. It was reissued on vinyl in the 1980s with a different cover, and various CD issues over the years have matched it with other sessions and/or bonus tracks. I do not see it on digital platforms…will have to see if something can be done about that as more ears need to hear this one

Bobby Hutcherson ‘Dialogue’

Ethereal vibes are challenged by deep bass clarinet growls, as angular piano fills offset sinewy bass lines. Rapid-fire trumpet riffs buffet intricate drum work as a mournful soprano sax line spirals skywards into the night. ‘Dialogue’ is vibraphone master Bobby Hutcherson’s first release as a leader, and it’s quite a statement. ‘Dialogue’ was a bold step forward into the “new thing,” and shares quite a bit of musical DNA with several other projects Hutch had been a participant in, including Andrew Hill’s ‘Point of Departure,’ Jackie McLean’s ‘One Step Beyond’ and Eric Dolphy’s ‘Out to Lunch.’ While not quite as edgy as the latter, enjoyment of ‘Dialogue’ requires an advanced sense of adventure and an appreciation for coloring outside the lines. Hutch pulled together compatriots from some of those aforementioned outside/inside records including Freddie Hubbard (trumpet), Andrew Hill (piano), Richard Davis (bass), Sam Rivers (tenor/soprano sax, bass clarinet, flute) and a key musical partner who’d remain in his orbit for many future albums, Joe Chambers (drums). While Hutch is credited as the leader, all of the writing is done by either Hill (four tracks) or Chambers (two tracks), and in a sense, it’s probably Hill who deserves co-leader billing here. That said, it’s tough to call out any specific player as the brilliance here is the conversation between them, and the insanely creative use of instrumentation to invoke moods. This is a challenging, cerebral record that moves from beautiful (“Idle While”) to unsettling (“Dialogue”); and from the zany, Avant-leaning “Les Noirs Marchant” (which could be the soundtrack to the Ents marching on Orthanc) to the demented blues of “Ghetto Lights.” So…chamber hard-bop? Avant modal blues? I can’t say this record “defies categorization,” but it does cover a LOT of ground. Everyone should hear it, but it’s not *FOR* everyone. Why it’s so difficult to find on vinyl is a real head-scratcher…here’s hoping someone @bluenoterecords gets the memo on this classic and puts it back in print soon

Graham Collier ‘Songs For My Father’

Graham Collier’s ‘Songs For My Father’ is a mind-blowing, progressive jazz album of incredible depth. The simplicity of each song title belies its underlying complexity. Each tune is named only for its order on the album, with a subtitle that indicates its structure and time signature. Whether this is unimaginative or genius isn’t for me to judge. Regardless, this nomenclature provides some useful context around the chaos that occurs when the lines between improv and composition get blurry. You guessed it: this isn’t casual background music, and probably not an album for “lean back” listeners. There’s a very British sensibility that gives the record a very different quality than the American jazz of the time. I dig “Song One (Seven-Four)” and “Song Three (Nine-Eight Blues),” both teeming with surprises that lurk around every corner. A couple of the band members here would later branch off into the 70s Canterbury scene, joining forces with Gilgamesh and Soft Machine. Early echoes of that sound are in nascent stages of guitarist Phil Lee’s playing, as well as Alan Wakeman’s soprano solo on the opening track. Today’s post is in memory of my father, who was taken from this world on this day many, many years ago. Graham Collier–bass; Harry Beckett–trumpet, flugelhorn; Phil Lee–guitar; John Taylor–piano; Alan Skidmore & Tony Roberts–tenor sax; Bob Sydor–tenor/alto sax; Alan Wakeman–tenor/soprano sax; Derek Wadsworth–trombone; John Webb–drums. This one is scarce on vinyl (this is a first pressing on Fontana 6309 006, stereo) but available digitally everywhere

Eastern Rebellion

‘Eastern Rebellion’ is an extraordinary, modal/advanced hard bop session from 1975 when it wasn’t particularly fashionable to make records like this. The five long-ish tunes are expertly played by the quartet of George Coleman (tenor sax), Cedar Walton (piano), Sam Jones (bass) and Billy Higgins (drums). This mix on this record is FANTASTIC—there’s a power in this session that the recording engineers captured perfectly, and it leaps from the speakers like the grooves in the vinyl remain charged with energy. Cedar Walton is the de facto leader of the group, kicking things off with his infectious original “Bolivia”—that bassline is quite an earworm, and Sam Jones is mixed nice n’ loud. Walton also kills it on “Mode for Joe,” which he wrote for Joe Henderson. The quartet’s take on “Naima” is TERRIFIC, and a highlight of the record. George Coleman also turns in a superb performance throughout, and the overall chemistry of the quartet results in a killer album that does not AT ALL sound like a child of the 1970s. ‘Eastern Rebellion’ was the first record to be released on the Dutch label Timeless (SJP 101), and it was also issued in the US on the Muse label (TI 306). It’s widely available across the digital spectrum too! This record doesn’t get talked about enough, and at a time when I see an influx of DMs with requests for records that are a bit off the beaten path, this seems like a good choice for a spin

Horace Tapscott ‘The Giant is Awakened’

The title is apt—the musical, political, and social repercussions that contextualize Horace Tapscott’s debut album continue to resonate today. The LA collective, which gave birth to the Pan-Afrikan Peoples Arkestra (P.A.P.A.) which evolved into the Union of God’s Musicians and Artists Ascension (UGMAA)—both a precursor to Kamasi Washington’s current collective. The spiritual and modal frameworks that channeled a motley collection of feelings—anger, hope, frustration, love, sadness, faith, and acceptance—into a narrative were powerful. Often profound. This LP covers a lot of ground, as freer waypoints appear along the spiritual pathways, making for a fascinating set of journeys. The nearly sidelong title track is quite a trip. The quintet has an interesting lineup with Tapscott on piano, Arthur Blythe KILLING IT on alto sax, Walter Savage Jr. *AND* David Bryant on bass, and drummer Everett Brown Jr. Originally released on Flying Dutchman in 1969, this is a 2020 reissue on Real Gone Music, limited to 1,000 copies. Loving this record

Grant Green ‘Feelin’ the Spirit’

Recorded 21 Dec 1962, ‘Feelin’ the Spirit’ was the last of the “theme” records Green would explore that year. Having previously gone west and then south of the border in previous sessions, Green recruited pianist Herbie Hancock and the ace rhythm duo of bassist Butch Warren and drummer Billy Higgins to take us all to church. The material is a collection of familiar spirituals like “Joshua Fit de Battle ob Jericho” and “Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen”, transmogrified into modern, soulful hard bop. The approach here ranges from reflective to celebratory, with the blues running deeply throughout. The interplay between Green and Hancock is marvelous, and while the tempos never really swing hard, the intensity is palpable. This is 1979 Japanese King pressing GXK 8117, stereo, a reissue of BST 84132. Preach